About your Search

20130115
20130123
STATION
MSNBCW 9
CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 7
WHUT (Howard University Television) 6
MSNBC 5
CNBC 3
KNTV (NBC) 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
WBFF (FOX) 2
WETA 2
KICU 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 57
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
read your articles every day for the past year or two. you have educated me. you have enhanced my knowledge of a lot of things that i have heard that comes out of the republicans or conservative talk-show hosts by criticize obama. after reading your article, i found out what i hear on a rush limbaugh and the michael savage show was absolutely a lie. host: you give us an example? caller: a whole solyndra tuition. i found out the facts by reading your article in our local paper. the whole solyndra thing started with the bush administration. guest: thanks for the kind words. i am glad that you are reading them in your local paper one thing we are trying to do, as much as we can, is get our work out in different ways. we have partnerships with television stations. have partnerships with newspapers. the one you are read for into in atlanta uses the truth-o-meter on state and local officials. i am glad to hear you are reading our work and their work and i am happy our word is getting out host:politifact looked at issues -- looks at issues like energy. what to do find overall? guest: a l
of it. where to begin? no matter what your leanings are and whether you know about education or not, let's turn to some of the language you are talking about. investing in very young children is the best investment you can make. it has the greatest return on investment. we know that because the first years of life are the most important for cognitive, social, and emotional development. you are only two years old ones. that is the most significant window of time. which brings me to the next point, yes, we have class warfare. those who are poor are completely left out of the national dialogue on poverty and hunger. that is a bipartisan effort, to keep people who are poor out of the national dialogue. that is why i work with low income women to be able to take photographs and provide direct testimony on their experiences with raising children in poverty, how to break cycles with poverty, and there are so many conversations happening. this concept of violence and the trail. people have been silenced for so many years. -- betrayal. people have been silenced for so many years. poverty is solva
of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these
. there is a disadvantage to a piecemeal bill, if you pass, for example, issues for educated people to get a visa, and they're taking care of, you lose a certain amount of support for the other issues. i do not think we should decide that. i think the senator is doing a great service by raising this issue. i think our colleagues at this meeting, i met this morning with the person -- he and i actually talk a lot. i believe we should move forward on all of the arrangements so that the hill will develop an understanding about all of these issues and finally decide whether they will do it in one, too, or three pieces. that is the least of our worry. the fact is they do it. we will continue to talk about a comprehensive bill. >> i am delighted that senator rubio is helping folks take the issue of immigration reform as seriously as he is taking it. he is providing leadership on that and we are appreciative. i think it is great to see movement on both sides of the aisle. whether or not it is comprehensive or individual pieces is to be determined by leadership in the house and senate in consultation with the presi
have some extraordinary assets in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated work force that in many respects outperforms, not out educated about from a point of view workers in virtually every effort country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. our companies have the lowest cost of capital of any companies anywhere around the globe. we have a spirit of entrepreneurship and innovation and capitalist system and commitment to a capitalist system that is the envy of virtually every other country in the world, and we also have increasingly as elude it to in the earlier panel have always had a very strong natural resources, but with shale oil and gas and the incredible strength of our agricultural industry we have a great natural resources as well so there's a lot to be bullish about in this country in terms of our economic opportunities, but this fiscal deficit, our fiscal policy is an enormous cloud on us reaching that potential and i work on the investment banking industry i used to be in the money-management industry. there is a phrase that sometimes
've only felt that the public itself needed to be engaged more on financial reform, to educate themselves better, make an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations at the end of the. i hope people will look at this recent. >> the former head of the fdic, sheila bair on the government's role during the country's worst financial crisis since the depression. her book is "bull by the horns." sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> next comic kansas governor sam brownback delivers his third state of the state address. in his remarks before the joint session of the house and senate, he gave his plans for balancing the state budget which faces a projected shortfall of $267 million for the fiscal year beginning july 1. this event in topeka is 25 minutes. >> good evening. mr. speaker, madam president, -- [applause] you jumped my laundry now going to have to repeat. you will have to do that again, i hope. i was just looking at her thinking there's a lot of new faces here. welcome. good to have you in the legislature. it's going to be a great you and they do have befor
spend on everything from education to public safety less as a share of the economy that has been true for a generation. that is not a recipe for growth. we have to do more to stabilize the finances over the medium and long-term, and also spur more growth in the short term. i have said i am hoping to making modest adjustments to programs like medicare to protect them for future generations. i also said we need more revenue for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a
of regulations. higher education is turning to the web to gain revenue. as colleges look for new ways to make money -- some -- such as san jose state university -- have added online courses -- to attract students. at for-profit institutions such as university of phoenix -- students obtain their degree on the internet. now -- many colleges and universities with physical campuses are trying out the web model. the education sector has struggled to add revenue throughout the recession. cordelia maloney -- of the unversity of illinois at chicago, says the online model could take off if universities find a way to do it right. "i think what people are really struggling to do right now is figuring out how to make it work. how to offer a very high quality education at a resonable price. and do it in a way that is engaging for students so that you don't have situations where students get into these things spend money on it -- and then discover they can't complete it." maloney says nearly a third of all students 25 and older are taking classes online. americans are spending more money to spruce up their
, on your side? >> the strategy on our side is what it has been all along, which is to educate, inform and organize and mobilize people at the grassroots who understand that reproductive freedom and choice is a fundamental right of women and that women's rights are human rights and we have to always be vigilant and fight against those who would take away that right. and i think, you know, when i became president of the organization in 1984-85, the passion was on the anti-abortion side. i think this last election in 2012 shows that the country has moved to understand that reproductive choices, reproductive decision making, is the purview of women. it's a personal, private, intimate right that needs to be outside of the realm of government, and that people voted, women were a factor in the election of president obama this year, and it was in large part because they saw the threat of -- to their rights, their fundamental right to equality, in the threat to their right to choose. >> kate michaelman, thanks so much. we'll be right back. mom's oven-baked tastes straight from the microwave. l
will essentially be cut close to have been the next decade. and so, we are talking about education programs. were talking about health programs, including nih research. were talking about infrastructure. we're talking that key domestic discretionary programs that are so important for the lives of the vast majority of the american people. so let me just say two things about that. number one, there has to be a balance. and number two, i think it is fido, as the president said so clearly yesterday, that the debt ceiling essentially must not use to say what then that essentially takes on and essentially undoes the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president made so clear what would he have staked if that were to happen and i just think it's so critical that not occur. you know, i've been through these battles as i've said for many decades, but i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff in terms of the full faith and credit of the united states. the consequences with teeth, i think, to not take, potentially cataclysmic. and for the republicans
of education, research and development, innovation energy. there are things we can do about it but we have to do them together as a country. that's our goal. >> i do think it's important to put in context and remember just how dark the days were four years ago and how in the middle of that meltdown, people were thinking about going to caves and getting spam and guns. it was dark. not only the president, but the president working with george w. bush and others really pitched in and had to make very tough decisions and a lot of hard votes that got a lot of people unelected from office to get us through that. >> when we got our first economic briefings, i wanted to get some spam and go into a cave. i know what you're talking about. >> that's why this is such an opportunity, though, for the president right now. the problems we're talking about are structural. they've been there for a long time. this declining middle class has gone on for two decades. it isn't just the recession. that means investing. this is where the problem of the debt comes in. if you're going to get bet
education in the entire world. if they cannot afford to do that, talk about $30 billion -- if we cannot afford to do that, i do not see what help we have upholding any sense of dignity, pretense of democracy, in the eyes of people in the rest of the world. [applause] >> i just have to add one thing to that -- one point i will add, to deny this to children is an act of thievery, but it is worse than stealing a car. this is an irreversible theft. you never get to live the second year of your life again. thatthis is it -- you get it once. then it is gone forever. i think the president fails to act on this aggressively, that dramatically, prophetically, to get this for us quickly -- i think is not just a budgetary issue. i think it is a theological abomination, a crime against the innocent. >> i agree. [applause] i say all the time, quoting -- the conversation could not be more timely. i sell the time, quoting dr. king, that budgets are moral documents. you can say what you say, but you are what you are. we know who you are when you put your budget on the table. we can see what your budget
, culture, art, and education. their patriotism is quiet, but deep. their values sustain our national life. now, i have used the words "they'' and "their'' in speaking of these heroes. i could say "you'' and "your,'' because i'm addressing the heroes of whom i speak -- you, the citizens of this blessed land. your dreams, your hopes, your goals are going to be the dreams, the hopes, and the goals of this administration, so help me god. we shall reflect the compassion that is so much a part of your makeup. how can we love our country and not love our countrymen, and loving them, reach out a hand when they fall, heal them when they're sick, and provide opportunity to make them self- sufficient so they will be equal in fact and not just in theory? can we solve the problems confronting us? well, the answer is an unequivocal and emphatic "yes.'' to paraphrase winston churchill, i did not take the oath i've just taken with the intention of presiding over the dissolution of the world's strongest economy. in the days ahead i will propose removing the roadblocks that have slowed our economy and redu
that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education. the sputnik launch in 1957. it may been to a younger generation to defuse because sputnik is probably not as -- as it is to the older generation but i was pretty clever. most of his slogans were not really caught on. the first summer he was in wishing to and he said, and it's a strange construct but he said in august this is the time when the shinki and becomes more -- and nobody knows what it means. somehow it's applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions that you want to talk about. yes, sir m.? >> i'm surprised you didn't mention the president's that we popularly think are so eloquent john f. kennedy. where they just good at regular words? >> john f. kennedy had some wonderful phrases and new frontier was his. but they were eloquent in their sensibility and the speeches. it wasn't that they created a term that was everlasting and some of them have interesting -- you would go to new frontier and go to term and. truman had costs are. he brought that bac
of the economy, retail, health care, education and defense spending, that's one-third of the economy, that's where we think the money is going in the next five years. those areas are right for change and venture capitalists are looking at that straight on. one-third of gdp will be revolutionized we see in the next five years. >> wow. >> so we talked to the wrong two guys if we're looking for areas that are seeing a contraction in venture capital. i mean, you guys happen t in the sweet spot right now. brad, is that a fair assessment? >> that is correct. we're seeing a huge expansion in investment. and, you know, if you're looking for an area that is growing very, very quickly, health care i.t. is the place to be. >> health care i.t. and also what john is talking about because you've got mobility taking over. so much data. i like to say nothing is growing as fast as data. >> that's right. maria, mobility is a horizontal play. it affects education. it affects health care and affects security and affects retail. it's really important, and mobility is not just the four-inch screen that we think
the print-outs of webmd -- >> that's me. >> google the symptoms. i think that's good. good to be educated and know what's going on and you also do face the risk of having too much. this overload. >> right. >> and so that's why it's important to practice your pitch. just like if you were -- if you have ten seconds to talk to your senator, or your boss, i mean, you would want to make sure that you really practice that pitch and so that's why it's so important to write down the key aspects of your story. >> wow. >> and rehearse it in advance. >> lots of pressure here. >> my cysister, is an er doctor and told me that history taking is an art form and done in a proper way. so how can doctors get better at it? i mean, we have the patient who is come in with the webmd stuff, we have patient who is want to talk to you for an hour. a lot of doctors are egotistical as my sister's were. is it on the doctor to get better at the art form or is it on patients to really learn how to tell their story? >> ideally, the doctor should get better. we all want better doctors and i think that as an educator mys
, an outside moment that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education and stuff, as had the sputnik launch in the 1957. it may have been to a younger generation it may have been too diffuse, because sputnik is probably not as big a thing as it is to an older generation, but that was pretty clever. but most of his slogans, most of his abilities so far have not, have not really caught on. the first summer he was in washington he said, and it's a strange construct, but he said in august he said this is the time when washington becomes all wee weed up and things are hard to get done. no one really knows what it means, but it's somehow applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions and want to talk about these things. yes, ma'am. >> i'm surprised that you didn't mention the president that we popularly think are the most eloquent; ronald reagan and john f. kennedy. were they just good at regular words, or did they -- >> oh, no, they had, i mean, john f. kennedy had wonderful phrases, and the new frontier was his. but
regenerate our interest research and development and education. it may have been too an younger generation. but most of the slogans had not really caught on. the first summer he's in washington, he said it is a strange concept, but in august, this is the time when washington becomes hard to get done. nobody knows what that means but it somehow applicable. does anyone have any questions? yes ma'am. >> i'm surprised you didn't mention the popular ones that we think of. were some presidents just that regular words? >> truman had some nice thihad . each one was kind of different. truman had -- they all have stories. we say a truman-ism is where he was having a lot of trouble with congress. and he brought up the word trocar, which is an instrument used to relieve pressure in organic places. in the perry in missouri, when a bowler cal -- a cow or a full would ingest too much error, they would ingest this trocar and it would create a whistling sound and he said that it was a trocar with congress. [laughter] he carve it in a piece of wood and hung it above his desk. there is eloquence. i really di
the science, i'll talk about that a little bit more in a minute, we work on public education, on policy initiatives, on web based and media advocacy, we have a lot of fun in that area so you should join us online and corporate accountability campaigns which i'll talk a little bit about later on in this presentation, we're really a community, so you can see pictures of different folks at different evens interacting and having a great time so we like to be hopeful that we can indeed prevent this disease and reduce the rates of breast cancer, and we have what we think is an amazing website that's full of all of the information that i'm going to present today and then some, so anything i talk about today, you can also find on our website which has rich information about the science, rich information about policy and ways that you can get involved, even by hiking in mount town this weekend and helping us raise some funds so we have some folks doing that in the audience as well, so as i said, we are a science-based organization, everything we do a rooted in a rich foundation in the science, a
's a hard story to cover. the president has to be an educate on climate issue. by giving it the form, not a paragraph, he's gone a long way to start the second term discussion on climate we need. >> we can't judge how historians are going to see this. i suspect on many issues, they'll see it as forward thinking. that doesn't take away from the fact it probably will be seen as the next couple years as a partisan speech. i think they best test how partisan the speech is, is not what republicans say on it, what democrats running for re-election on the senate two years from now say on the speech and what democrats say in swing districts about the speech. i don't know you're going to get a lot of these democrats running in conservative states where the president got below 45%, and there are quite a few, in 2014, are going to be talking about gay rights, climate change and gun control. rober robert. >> look. every district is unique and different, as you well know and as we know, as we looking through the map. i think the speech, talking, as doug said about seneca falls and stonewall and s
is that they are eventually getting their diplomas. >> a new study from the u.s. department of education finds a national high school graduation rate is at the highest since 1976. >> the study finds the dropout rate for male students was 3.8%. for females, it just under 3%. researchers say the dropout rate was higher among males in every state. >> official said the steady rise of students completing their education is a reflection of the struggling economy that's created greater competition for new jobs. darya. >> thank you a lot more. in national moods, supporters of longtime pen state football coach joe paterno are marking the one-year anniversary of his death with a candlelight vigil. the hall of fame coach died of lung cancer last year at 85. his supporters will hold a vigil at the mural in state college that includes a depiction of paternal. the paternal family is expected to attend. >> organizers say they will like 409 candles, one of each of paternal victories before many were stripped as part of the n.c.a.a. sanctions in response to the jerry sandusky sex abuse scandal. >> today marks the fourth anniv
their children in a classroom with a teacher engaging in the reason they are there, education. we should not ask our teachers to be armed. they have come out against this in a multitude of venues. i find it just almost ludicrous that the answer to gun violence is more guns, that is not the solution that the american people want, and we, frankly, you know, deserve to live in communities that are gun violence-free. jenna: eric, quick final thought? >> the polls just don't bear that out. gallop showed last month that more americans want armed teachers and principals than want gun restrictions. even the chiefs of police that have been polled and surveyed on this. 79% of them think that people should be able to carry firearms concealed. so it's just not true to say that the american people don't want this. we live in a culture -- jenna: as a journalist i can say a lot of numbers deserve a lot more context than we can provide for them today. >> can i mention one thing. the gallop poll was proven to be ineffective and categorically wrong in a number of areas in the fall elections. i'm not sure we want
administration. making the transportation department work with the education department, work with the e.p.a., sustainable communicates, promised neighborhoods. to invest in brain power and education, and also lift up neighborhoods at the same time. and to his credit, he's been more collabrative with mayors, i think than we've seen in a long time. so i have a lot of hope for the second term. >> mayor castro of san antonio, texas, and brother joaquin castro in congress, very kind of you to spend a moment with us. >> great to be here. >> the president will be leaving the capitol shortly. he'll go out the east front where members of the u.s. military have been assembled so that we can symbolically review the troops. and we have leon panetta joining us now from inside the capitol. can you hear us, second panetta? >> i can, good to talk to you. >> nice to talk to you, mr. secretary. >> i don't three weeks ago any americans would have thought that north africa would be at the top of the security concerns. we've heard three americans were killed in that hostage situation in algeria and seven am
increasingly goes digital and students would be using many more education resources, and using textbooks and new technologies that come out. it's about nobody up to this point has focused on putting the student first. so chegg has taken the position that our goal is to give the students what they need, our mission is to save them time, save them money, get them smarter. the education process is really difficult. it's really fragmented. i have two daughters, rachel and samantha, and one went through the process and the other is going through it now. and it's just really complicated, really expensive, and it's not necessary anymore. >> you know, of course facebook started in a college dorm, conceivably as a social network originally for students who were in college. what's going to differentiate chegg from any other social m network that is out there, and why as a student i would want to be on it? >> we think of it more as a connective learning platform. it's focused on the students' lifetime while in school, their academic needs, their needs as a student. it's probably more similar to lin
. it happens because of an election and then it means going online, it means doing rallies, it means educating your neighbors at church and the workplace and in school. >> now, you're using the word takers in this speech, i mean going right after the right and a reminder of people what the election was about. i looked right across at paul ryan when he said it. i mean, given the republicans parties and their positions right now, can he get this agenda done? >> i think republicans sometimes look to the next election, too. and when they think about how the demographics are changing, how the philosophy of young people is changing, i the they understand that when you're talking about this 47%, the takers, it's veterans and people who paid the medicare and realize it's workers that aren't making much money, that are making $11, $12 an hour. if republicans don't listen, they pay a price in elections. that's why i'm of the miptimist we can reach an agreement on these really important proposals. >> do you think that republicans are getting that the country has changed, the demographics has changed, 195
ant to provide them with materials, education materials that are up to daat and current bbcauus a lot of the books are at least 10 yeaas ood oo older, we're doing that hrough a some volunteers bring in some mateeials today to helppus and our re-shelving process. process. the library... rrepir... taaes part... in... three phases... / &pbeautificatiin,... re--helving... books... and... the dedication of a corner. it was the same story over in northhass baltimore.but instead of a ibrary... people were fixing up a lace for kidssto play safely. volunteers painted eeces aad dug up and ssoothed out the spiiit of dr. kingg 11:58:48-11:58:57"we're tryyng to be helpful in ballimore and this sort of embodies some of the things dr. king was committed to and we are too." &ptoo."operation: olivee' ii a neighborhood, and tackling them aa the resources become avvilable. 3 33 3 3 3 heeravens make a major &pcoaching decisiin eeks before the super bowl....oo it impacts next year's team... 3and she was gettiig away...... at two miles an hour.the response this woman gave whenn a police officer pull
read your articles every day for the past year or two. you have vegetated me. -- educated me. a lot of things i have heard that have come out of the republican or conservative talk show hosts that criticize obama -- after reading your article, i found out that what -- right here on the rush limbaugh show was a lie. the whole situation, i found out the true fact by readin gyour article in our local paper. the whole true thing -- the whole solydnra thing started with the bush adminstration. the fast a furious thing. host:let's go to bill for a response. guest:thanks for the kind words. i am glad you are reading them we are trying to get our work out in different ways. we have partnershuips with newspapers. they use the truth-o-meter. i am glad you are readin gour work and their work and happy our word is getting out. host: our caller but up solyndra, looking at the president's promises regarding energy. guest: a lot of that was included in the stimulus bill. a big grab bag, $77 billion of goodies that included many things foraenergy and the environment. i know that a lot were include
. this is renowned author, educator and political activist angela davis who spoke last night, founder of the group critical resistance, a grassroots effort to in the prison industrial complex. davis voiced support for president obama, the said much work needs to be done. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential the agendas. our passionate support for president barack obama and it is wonderful that we can say for the second time, president barack obama, and we support him and are passionate about that support. but that support should also be expressed in our determination to raise issues that have largely been ignored or not appropriately addressed by the administration. and let me say that we are aware that we should be celebrating, critically celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. [applause] there should be massive celebrations this year. what has happened other than the film "lincoln"? and of course with 2.5 million people behind bars today, the prison system, the immigrant detention system are terrible remain
't got a clue and they actually support something they think is law. so the education part of it is one aspect of it. but you've also got the sheer power, the emotion of the 9/11 families style approach where you've got the sandy hook families coming in, it's very hard to oppose -- it's not about the president. you've got -- it's not even about bloomberg's money that's going to go into the advertising. the emotional force of the sandy hook families is just like it was with the 9/11 families. and republicans have got to face up to that. frankly, democrats have to face up and grow a spine here as well. they have run away from the gun debate for 20 years or so because it's helped them get into power in some states. >> by the way, there are 30 to 40 democrats in the house, too, will also fight any reasonable, rational reforms. you know, one of the moments yesterday, richard, that i thought was really telling, i thought one of the president's strongest moments is when he said if you have a congressman or congresswoman that supports assault weapons, ask them why. see, that's where the extremi
malkin, she thinks that's child abuse. some might call it education. some might call it america. here's how the drudge report rewarded the president of the united states for allowing children to share their voices and opinions. a picture of stalin with a small child. and if you had the bad sense to click onto the next page, oh, you were treated to this charming picture of adolf hitler with a little girl. on fox news the far right was just as unhinged. >> i consider it a form of child abuse and political malpractice. >> so conservatives say the president is an un-american tyrannical child abuser. is he really this bad? they must have a plan to stop him. >> after listening to the 23 executive actions the president announced today my next guest has decided to stand up to king obama and in a hannity exclusive senator rand paul is unveiling new legislation to stop obama's assault on your second amendment rights. >> in this bill we will nullify anything the president does that smacks of legislation. and there are several of the executive orders that appear as if he's writing new law. that c
job not just to entertain, put it in context, teach and educate. call me 1-800-743-cnbc. all right. sometimes you just have to don the old bear costume, put yourself in gogi's hat or gentle ben's boo-boo's paws to understand this market. the dow roaring 85 points, and nasdaq climbing .59%, happy days here again. it's one of those days. see, we're always trying to understand the coloration of the market. but sometimes we literally can't do so unless we go to jelly stone national park and get all ersine about it. why? well, think about when you own a stock and something terrific happens but the stock goes down anyway. what do you think? what goes through your mind? perhaps you say maybe the news isn't as good as we thought. or perhaps i got to do more homework. maybe this news was already baked into the stock and that's why it didn't go higher. however, it's far more likely that you would be emotional about it. you would say, i give up. all that homework, all that good news, all those positives, they didn't matter. this just must be a horrible moment for the market, and it is a huge
, well-educated, has his wife, coretta, and for children caught the young guest who were quite young, the youngest boreman 63, born in birmingham. so dexter irca the youngest is just an infant during this period. this is a period when dr. king is most political, in the sense that in the early your workout in the parting of the waters come he's getting drawn into other people's movements because he's an orator, and he would go help out. the bus boycott wasn't his idea. the freedom rides and the sit-ins certainly weren't his idea to give he would get called in to these meetings. but by 1963 where we start here, he's right and that the south is hardened against segregation and that the moment in history might fit without implementing something into history that will resist that recession, that retrograde trend. and he takes a huge risk to the he says i'm going to have my own movement. i'm going to risk everything. first in birmingham to try to crack segregation and then later in selma, where we ending 65, after the long year of 64 where he is lobbying and submitting to jail when st. aug
much he's learned. he's had the ultimate washington education so we see two changes in him. one is the philosophical change we've been talking about. this is the president who didn't always say what he really thought in the first term. when there were terrible storms that leveled parts of missouri he flew down there and he gave consoling speeches in which he talked about thosetorms as acts god which really angered some of the climate advocates because they said how can you talk about this like an act of god when we believe that this is linked to climate change and we can do something about it? gun control. this is a president who did very little on gun control in his first term and within hours of the newtown shooting you could see how that changed. he came out and made that first statement and you said to yourself this is a president who's going to try to do something about gun control. the second questn isow much smarter he's gotten about the washington maneuvering. the white house did do a better job at playing out the recent series of debt and budget negotiations. the quest
to fund their college educations. she told the audience her next goal is to open a boarding school for underprivileged kids. >> 95 to 90 percents of the students will graduate because any kid that is not in the classroom, mama brown will be up in the dorm. >> reporter: cathryn couch of sonoma explained how volunteers with her project has change the teenagers who learned to prepare meals for the critically ill. >> everyone teen has had someone look them in the eye thank you for helping save my life. you're not the same after that whether your's 15, 13 or 5. >> reporter: winner lisa markey giraldi included the disabled in everyday activity. >> being able to work with people and make a difference in their lives is the most rewarding feeling in the world. and i feel very blessed to be able to do work that i love. >> reporter: mark ruefenacht stepped up to the podium with a dog, one of many his organization has trained to alert diabetics to a dangerous change in blood sugar levels. he said he believes volunteering is a way of life. >> true happiness i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)